Tubal Implants: What to Expect at Home

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Your Recovery

A tubal implant is a permanent type of birth control. After the implant is done, you may have cramps. These can feel like menstrual cramps.

This care sheet gives you a general idea about how long it will take for you to recover. But each person recovers at a different pace. Follow the steps below to feel better as quickly as possible.

How can you care for yourself at home?

Activity

  • You may be able to return to work and daily activities on the same day. But if you got medicine to help you relax, you'll need to wait a day.

Medicines

  • Your doctor will tell you if and when you can restart your medicines. He or she will also give you instructions about taking any new medicines.
  • If you take blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or aspirin, be sure to talk to your doctor. He or she will tell you if and when to start taking those medicines again. Make sure that you understand exactly what your doctor wants you to do.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain medicine, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve) if you need to. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.
  • Do not take two or more pain medicines at the same time unless the doctor told you to. Many pain medicines have acetaminophen, which is Tylenol. Too much acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be harmful.

Other instructions

  • If you have bleeding, you can use a sanitary pad.
  • Be sure to use another type of birth control for 3 months. You can stop using birth control after you have an X-ray to make sure that your tubes are blocked.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor or nurse call line if you are having problems. It's also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

When should you call for help?

Call your doctor or nurse call line now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You have belly pain that is getting worse.
  • You have sudden, severe belly pain that feels stronger than menstrual cramps.
  • You have a fever.

Watch closely for any changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor or nurse call line if:

  • You think you might be pregnant.

Where can you learn more?

Go to http://www.healthwise.net/ed

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