Health Information and Tools > Patient Care Handouts >  Learning About Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH)
Facebook Tweet Email Share

Main Content

Learning About Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH)

What is left ventricular hypertrophy?

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) means that the muscle of the heart's main pump (left ventricle) has become thick and enlarged. This can happen over time if the left ventricle has to work too hard. This part of the heart needs to be strong to pump oxygen-rich blood to your entire body. When the ventricle gets thick, other changes can happen in the heart. The heart's electrical system might not work normally, the heart muscle may not get enough oxygen, and the heart may not pump as well as it should.

LVH is usually caused by high blood pressure. It may also be caused by a heart problem, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or a heart valve problem like aortic valve stenosis.

It can be stressful to learn that you have a problem with your heart. But there are things you can do to feel better and help keep this condition from getting worse.

What are the symptoms?

LVH may not cause symptoms. When it does, the most common ones are:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Feeling tired or dizzy.
  • Angina symptoms, such as chest pain or pressure, which may be worse when you're active.
  • Feeling like your heart is fluttering, racing, or pounding (palpitations).

New or worse symptoms may be a sign of heart failure. Heart failure means that your heart doesn't pump as much blood as your body needs.

What can you expect when you have LVH?

LVH is linked to an increased risk of other problems, including heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and heart rhythm problems. Treatment can help reduce these risks.

How is LVH treated?

The best treatment will depend on what caused LVH. For many people, the focus will be on treating high blood pressure. Getting high blood pressure under control may keep LVH from getting worse. This can help prevent heart failure. It can also help lower the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Medicines and lifestyle changes are used to treat high blood pressure. It may take some time to find the right medicine or medicines for you. Work with your doctor by taking your medicines as prescribed and going to all of your follow-up appointments.

If LVH was caused by a heart problem, you may have other treatment options. Treatment may help lower your risk of heart failure and other serious problems.

What you can do at home

Healthy habits are important for your heart. Taking an active role in your treatment can help you feel better and protect your health.

  • Be more active. Talk to your doctor before you start an exercise program. Together you can create a plan that can help keep your heart and body healthy. Your doctor might suggest that you get 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity on most days of the week.
  • Eat heart-healthy foods. Heart-healthy foods include fruits, vegetables, high-fibre foods, fish, and foods low in sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat.
  • Lose extra weight. Being active and eating healthy foods can help you stay at a healthy weight or lose weight if you need to.
  • Take your medicines exactly as prescribed. Do not stop or change your medicines without talking to your doctor first. Talk to your doctor if you have problems with your medicines.
  • Don't smoke. Quitting smoking lowers your risk of heart attack and stroke. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. These can increase your chances of quitting for good.
  • Manage other health problems. These include diabetes and high cholesterol. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol or drug use, talk to your doctor.

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor or nurse call line if you are having problems. It's also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Where can you learn more?

Go to https://www.healthwise.net/patientEd

Enter W333 in the search box to learn more about "Learning About Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH)".

Care instructions adapted under license by your healthcare professional. If you have questions about a medical condition or this instruction, always ask your healthcare professional. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information.