Health Information and Tools > Patient Care Handouts >  Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT): About Your Child's Test
Facebook Tweet Email Share

Main Content

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT): About Your Child's Test

What is it?

An alanine aminotransferase (ALT) test measures the amount of the enzyme ALT in the blood. ALT is found mainly in the liver. When ALT levels are higher than normal, it can mean that the liver is damaged or diseased.

Why is this test done?

The ALT test is done to:

  • Look for liver disease, such as hepatitis.
  • Help check for liver damage.
  • Find out whether jaundice was caused by a blood disorder or liver disease.
  • Keep track of the effects of medicines that can damage the liver.

How can you prepare for the test?

In general, you don't need to do anything before your child has this test. Your doctor may give you some specific instructions.

What happens during the test?

A health professional takes a sample of your child's blood.

How long does the test take?

The test will take a few minutes.

Follow-up care is a key part of your child's treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor or nurse call line if your child is having problems. Ask your doctor when you can expect to have your child's test results.

Where can you learn more?

Go to https://www.healthwise.net/patientEd

Enter A250 in the search box to learn more about "Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT): About Your Child's Test".

Care instructions adapted under license by your healthcare professional. If you have questions about a medical condition or this instruction, always ask your healthcare professional. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information.