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Managing Your Addiction

Are You Fit for Work?

​​​​​​​What does being fit for work mean?

Being fit for work means going to work ready to do your job safely, and being able to work safely for the whole day.

How can I get healthy and stay safe at work?

To be healthy and safe, you need to look after your physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Taking care of yourself can make you feel like you have more energy.  It can also help you manage your stress—at home and at work.

When you’re healthy, you’re less likely to get sick or have an accident at work. You may also get well faster if you are sick or injured.

What can I do to be fit for work?

  • Eat well, exercise regularly, and get enough sleep.
  • Visit your doctor for regular checkups.
  • Reduce or stop doing things that put your health at risk (e.g., smoking, abusing alcohol and other drugs, or problem gambling).
  • Find healthy ways, such as exercising or learning a hobby, to deal with stress.
  • Ask for help from your friends, family, co-workers, and your spiritual community when you need it.
  • Talk to a counselor if you need help dealing with personal problems.
  • Take part in workplace wellness programs.

How can I help make my workplace safe?​

If you’re worried about your own fitness for work, talk to your health care provider or join an employee assistance program. If you’re worried about a co-worker’s fitness for work, talk to a supervisor or a union representative.

How much is too much?

Any unhealthy use of alcohol or other drugs, even if it only happens once, can mean you aren’t fit for work.

You may have a problem if drugs or alcohol are affecting:

  • your work
  • your finances
  • your family and friends
  • or any other part of your life

Is gambling affecting my work?

Gambling may be affecting your work if you are:

  • spending a lot of time gambling during lunch hours and after work
  • feeling distracted, missing deadlines, or not showing up to work
  • having a lot of mood swings
  • being secretive or dishonest

How can I get help?

If you’re worried about your own or someone else’s drinking, drug use, or gambling, Alberta Health Services can help. Services across the province provide private, professional, and caring support.

Current as of: September 19, 2016

Author: Addiction & Mental Health, Alberta Health Services