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Learning About Pectus Excavatum Repair in Children

A normal chest compared to a sunken chest (pectus excavatum)

What is it?

This is a surgery to correct pectus excavatum (pectus). Pectus is a problem with the cartilage that connects the bones of the chest. It's sometimes called funnel chest or sunken chest. It looks like a dent in the centre of your child's chest.

Some children with pectus may feel short of breath when they are active. Your child may be troubled by how his or her chest looks. Surgery can treat these problems.

How is it done?

Before surgery, your child will get medicine to make him or her sleep.

Surgery can be done two ways. Your doctor will tell you which one is best for your child.

Nuss procedure.

Small cuts (incisions) are made on both sides of the chest. The doctor inserts a bar behind the breastbone and attaches it to the ribs. The breastbone is held in place for 2 to 4 years. Then the bar is removed.

Ravitch procedure.

In this open-chest surgery, cartilage that is the wrong shape is removed. Then the breastbone (sternum) is moved to the right position. Sometimes a metal bar is placed to hold the bone in place until it heals.

When surgery is finished, the doctor will close the cuts with stitches or staples.

What can you expect after surgery?

Your child will spend several days in the hospital after surgery.

Your doctor may want your child to sleep on his or her back for several weeks after surgery. You will need to limit your child's activities for several months after surgery. This will help the bar stay in place in your child's chest.

The doctor may suggest physiotherapy, breathing exercises, or other treatments.

You will get instructions about how to care for your child at home.

Where can you learn more?

Go to https://www.healthwise.net/patientEd

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