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Sexual and Reproductive Health

Non-Gonococcal Urethritis (NGU)

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NGU is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) in males, which affects the urethra (the tube that carries urine and semen through the penis). It can be caused by many different germs (e.g., chlamydia) or other germs that aren’t known.

How do I get NGU?

Males get NGU through unprotected sexual contact (oral, vaginal, or anal sex without a condom) with a partner infected with bacteria that can cause NGU.

You can infect others right after you come in contact with the germs that cause NGU. You can pass on the germs to others without knowing it.

How do I prevent NGU?

When you’re sexually active, the best way to prevent NGU is to use condoms for oral, vaginal, and anal sex.

Don’t have any sexual contact if you or your partner(s) have symptoms of an STI, or may have been exposed to an STI. See a doctor or go to an STI Clinic for testing.

Get STI testing regularly every 3 to 6 months and when you have symptoms.

How do I know I have NGU?

Some males with NGU don’t have any symptoms. If you have NGU, you might have:

  • pain or burning when you pee
  • clear, creamy white, or yellow discharge from the penis
  • irritation or itching inside the penis

The best way to find out if you have NGU is to see a nurse or doctor and get tested.

Is NGU harmful?

If NGU isn’t treated, it can lead to serious health problems like infertility or infection in the testicles.

These effects can be prevented if you get early STI testing and treatment.

How is NGU treated?

NGU is treated with antibiotics.

Your partner(s) needs to be tested and treated, even if there are no symptoms.

You can get re-infected if you have unprotected sex with someone before he or she is treated.

If you still have symptoms 3 to 4 weeks after taking antibiotics, see your nurse or doctor.

When can I have sex again?

It will take 1 week for the antibiotic to get rid of the infection. Don’t have unprotected sex (oral, vaginal, or anal sex without a condom) for 7 days after you and your partner(s) are treated. The best protection is not to have sex (oral, vaginal, or anal) for at least 7 days.

If you still have symptoms, don’t have any sexual contact.

What if I still have symptoms following treatment?

Please contact your healthcare provider.

For More Information

  • Health Link – Health Advice 24/7: 811

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