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Your Child’s Surgery

Staying in the hospital more than 1 night

​Your child may need to stay in the hospital for more than 1 night. The room they go to may have a bed, cot, or reclining chair beside each patient bed for an adult family member to rest on. You may also have access to a shared bathroom. Check with the hospital for more information on having a family member stay overnight. Please be mindful of your noise level and the number of visitors in the room.

Please label all personal items with your child’s first name and last initial.

Preventing infections in the hospital

You can help stop the spread of germs and bacteria that can make your child, you, and others sick. The best way to stop the spread of germs is to wash your hands. Learn more about hand washing in the hospital.

If you or other visitors have a fever, cough, runny nose, flu-like symptoms, or any other illness that can spread from person to person stay home. Wait until you are well before you visit your child in the hospital. If you have questions about visiting your child in hospital while you are sick, please talk to your child’s nurse or the nurse in charge.

How to keep everyone safe at the hospital

The following actions will help prevent the spread of infection to your child, other patients, visitors, and yourself.

  • Clean your hands with the alcohol-based hand sanitizer (such as Microsan) each time you go in and out of your child’s room. Wash your hands with soap and water after you use the bathroom or when your hands look dirty.
  • Clean your hands before and after you feed or bathe your child, change your child’s diaper, or do other things to care for your child.
  • Remind others who visit your child to clean their hands before and after they touch your child.
  • Wear a mask if you’re coughing, sneezing, or have a runny nose.
  • Don’t share toys or personal items with other children in the hospital.

Isolation room guidelines


Talking with Children 

Your child may need to be in isolation at the hospital to help protect them from germs. You’ll see a sign on the door or curtain that explains what steps to follow to keep everyone safe. It’s important that everyone who comes to your child’s bedside follows these steps, including you, family members, friends, and healthcare staff.

How to keep everyone safe when your child is on isolation

The following actions will help prevent the spread of infection to your child, other patients, visitors, and yourself.

  • Follow the instructions on the sign that’s on the door about what to do each time you go into your child’s room.
  • Isolation gowns should only be worn in your child’s room. Do not leave your child’s room wearing the isolation gown and don’t reuse the gowns. Always place the used gown in the laundry basket when you leave the room. Always clean your hands after you take off a gown, gloves, or a mask.
  • Your child should not leave their room unless the nurse in charge has said it’s OK.
  • Wear a mask if you’re coughing, sneezing, or have a runny nose.
  • Leave all hospital toys in your child’s room so hospital staff can clean them.
  • Don’t share toys or personal items with other children in the hospital.
  • If your child is on isolation, do not visit other patients or parents.​

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