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Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls

Make the Most of Your Vision

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Your eyes not only see where you are going, but help with balance and movement. As you age, your eyes change.

  • Your eyes are more sensitive to glare and need more time to adjust to sudden light changes.
  • Your eye lose depth perception. It becomes harder to judge distance and depth. This can affect how you see stairs and curbs.
  • You need more light to see at night. A 60-year-old needs 10 times more light to see at night than a teenager.

Take Action

  • Have your eyes checked each year. Alberta residents can have their eyes checked free every year after they are 65 years.
  • If you have multifocal lenses, tilt your head down to look out of the top half of your glasses when using stairs.
  • Remove your reading glasses when walking.
  • Pause and give your eyes time to adjust to changes in light.
  • Have a lamp by your bed with a switch that is easy to reach. Use the maximum wattage recommended in each light fixture.
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  • Watch for glare. Eliminate exposed or bare bulbs. Use blinds or light curtains on your windows. Wear sunglasses outside both in winter and summer.
  • Keep pathways well-lit inside and outside. Use night lights and motion detector lights.
  • Use non-skid or reflective strips at the edge of each step. Use a different colour than the stairs to make it easier to see the edges. Use them on door thresholds too. Remove patterned carpet on stairs.

"I hadn't realized it was 3 years since I saw the eye doctor. I can see better now. I just have to be careful on the stairs as I get used to my new bifocals."


Watch this 1½ minute video to learn about getting around your home with vision problems.

home-vision

If you have low vision, watch this short video to learn about aids to help you cope.

vision-aids

Resources

To learn more about your risk of falling complete the “Is there a chance you might fall?” checklist.

Current as of: June 30, 2019

Author: Fall Risk Management Program